Simplicity 9053: shoot for the moon, and vice versa


Here we have Simplicity 9053, MISSES’ SHIRT, PANTS, SKIRT, AND KNIT TOP, copyright 1999 Simplicity Pattern Co. Inc. 

Usually my projects start with the pattern, but this one started with the fabric, because it is this INCREDIBLE fabric:


I only captured this one photo, with the partial title stamped on the selvage, before cutting into it, but the full name of this print is “SHOOT FOR THE MOON & VICE VERSA” which wins for most baffling textile print title of all time. 

I mean, first off, what’s the vice versa refering to? Which part is meant to be reversed? Am I supposed to read this in my head as, “Shoot for the Moon, and Moon for the Shoot?” Or is it, “(You) shoot for the moon, and the moon will shoot for you?” Neither??? Makes any sense? 

Second, why moon? This print has no moons or celestial anything, while also having no arrows, rockets, or anything moon-shootable. Am I gonna throw fish at the moon?

And thirdly, what even is this print?! It’s like…dragon scales and toast with a layer of pineapple skin, placed on a lattice.

When I found it at the thrift shop I thought it looked in the style of an African wax print, but the longer it sat on my shelf the more it started looking sort of Bayeux Tapestry related, like chain mail and sugar loafs and half-timber buildings. And now I have no idea. But it’s not moons. 

Nice that the selvedge has a date though. 1969. Nice to know it’s old crazy, not new crazy. 


So, the skirt! I made the short version. 

I have a couple rules for my projects, one of which is that after a complex project I must always sew something quick and easy (another is must always make something for myself after making something for someone else, so as to keep it from feeling like work). This skirt was supposed to be the thought-free project following the 70’s jeans and the backpack (already breaking the rule of alternating simple with complex there) but I complexed it up for myself by making the inner waist facing be an outer, featured, contrast waist, which totally scrambled up my order of construction and made it so that I had to actually think about my order of construction, which I did not want to do, but I had to do. For the fabric. Couldn’t let this fabric down. 

This was one of those projects that I grew to hate while making, and had to let it cool before I liked it again. Mainly because it was supposed to be my easy project, but maybe also because it’s a familiar shape. I had at least three short and low waisted skirts like this in the early 2000’s, and I have actually used this pattern once, in fact those diagonal lines on the cover are mine, I drew those in testing out the stripe direction to make a long, pocketless skirt, which was the original use of this fabric. 

So between having been here and done this, and having to actually think about this one with my brain, and having to do an invisible zipper in fishscale, I was super over it before I was actually done with it and wasn’t super Quality Control by the end of it. 


See? Invisible zip doesn’t totally match, and the yoke is shy of the zipper. I know, it’s pretty ok as is, but the movie version of my life will be better. 

Another thing I changed: that self belt is meant to be real, as in really go around the waist and really be tied and untied every time I got dressed. I made it seam into the yoke so I never have to untie it. Now what to do with all that rage I’ve saved. 

Sew It or Throw It: 

I want to throw it, but I bet that if I just let it cool even longer, and promise to my future self to leave the facing alone and sew it to the inside like it’s supposed to do, I bet I would want to sew this again. Maybe even the long pants in View C. Except that they have the zipper in the back, which seems extremely wrong for casual pants, and I would have to put it in the front, and add a fly under lap, and extend the waist facing, and the idea of all that makes me feel over it all over again before I’ve even started, so, ugh, it’s a Sew but on probabtion. So there! 


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13 thoughts on “Simplicity 9053: shoot for the moon, and vice versa

  1. You crack me up!
    Put the skirt away for a little while. Because when you pull it out again, I’m thinking you will see it with fresh eyes…and like it!! Love how you styled it. Way cute!

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  2. I think you are skipping over the fact that this textile was likely named in 1969. I wouldn’t know, I suppose, but I imagine there were enough drugs around to make toast and fish scales appear to be moon features! And there was the moon landing…

    I like it too. Nice job.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the pattern matching at the side seams, the diagonal seems to give it another look – its a great skirt, like gigantic snake skin – I figure its one of those things you make and in 6 months time it makes perfect sense

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  4. Hi Lisa, I love the skirt. I also, did a little research about your fabric (very nosey) which I think it is Italian, printed in Turin. If you type it into Pintrest you will see another example called Fancy Delancy, great name from 1969. The company specialised in interior fabrics. As for the name, if it has a meaning, I would read it as ‘to the moon and back’ as in the phrase ‘love you to the moon and back’ which I guess is appropriate for your skirt.

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  5. I think your skirt looks fab, I wasn’t convinced when I saw the first photo of the fabric, your description is perfect!! But made up I think it looks great, love the side seam look and I think your zipper is amazing, leave it a while before you throw it, it might be a grower.

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  6. Great skirt, great fabric, but you certainly have a knack for writing there – such an entertaining description which brought a smile to my face – thanks for that!!

    Like

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